Earthquakes before, during and after

Earthquakes before, during and after

Earthquakes

Earthquakes Preparing for disasters is key to your survival. Making a contingency plan and purchasing a reliable survival kit is paramount. Practicing your disaster every six months and checking your survival kits will ensure your survival.

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Have a disaster plan for Earthquakes. Because earthquakes can strike suddenly and without warning, and in some cases can lead to other problems such as fires or tsunamis, it’s critical to have and practice a contingency plan for your household and family so that it can be given a second chance. nature is when you need it. to act upon it.

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Buy a reliable earthquake survival kit Having an earthquake survival kit wherever you spend time will increase your chances of survival. Kits should contain essential items to help you survive for a minimum of 72 hours. At Survival Kits Online we have kits in different sizes. It is best to keep a kit wherever you spend time. Get one for the car, office, home and school.

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Give your home an earthquake check. Check for hazards, attach shelves to wall studs and store breakables and poisons in cabinets that close so they can’t fall out and fall on someone in an earthquake. Place heavy objects on lower shelves and secure heavy furniture by mounting it to the wall or blocking the rollers so they don’t slip. Make any structural repairs to the walls or foundation that are required.

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Practice exercises with your family and colleagues for Earthquakes. Know where the utility shut off switches are in the house and time to move from your bedroom out of the house to a safe location. Time for yourself to do the same thing again, but disable utilities and grab your travel bag, documents and check on family members along the way. In a real emergency you may not have time for that, but it’s important to see if it’s possible.

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Familiarize yourself with common myths about earthquakes. Earthquake myths abound, and many dissuade people from doing it safe in an emergency. For example, you may have heard that during an earthquake you have to stand in a door frame to protect yourself from collapsing walls. That’s not true at all: Door frames in most homes are lightweight and will collapse easily.

You should only stand in a doorway if you are sure it is sturdy and load-bearing in your home. Other myths, such as “earthquakes only happen in the morning” and “hot and dry equals earthquake weather,” are false. The idea that you should hide next to furniture instead of under it is also wrong.
During: Crawling under something solid or looking for an open space

Shield yourself or hide under sturdy furniture. The old “get under your desk” rule is a good one, but only if your desk is sturdy enough to withstand the impact. If you can, get under it and hold on. If you are in bed, try to cover head and body with pillows and hold.

When you are outside, move away from tall objects that could collapse. This includes buildings, trees, utility poles, street lights, construction equipment, anything high that could fall due to shaking or rolling. Try to get a spot as clear and open as possible, such as a park or parking lot. Once you are out in the open, lie down on the floor and linger.

If you’re in a vehicle, stop quickly, but try to stay away from those tall objects. You don’t want anything to fall on your car. Stay in the car and shelter in place. When the earthquake is over, tune in to the emergency radio and watch out for bridges, ramps, or other structures that may be damaged.

After the earthquake: avoid damaged structures and watch out for aftershocks

Do not immediately assume that the danger has passed after an earthquake. In some cases, damaged structures may fall well after the shaking has stopped, or there may be other hazards in or around your home or office. Assess the situation and execute your contingency plan. Meet your family or colleagues in a safe area, away from damaged buildings and other hazards such as hanging wires, fires, gas leaks, falling glass or uneven ground. Be prepared for aftershocks, which can be just as dangerous as the original earthquake.

If you are trapped under rubble, make as much noise as possible so that emergency services can reach you. Tap pipes, whistle, scream. Try not to inhale dust or dirt around you. Cover your mouth with clothing to filter out some of the dust. If you can move or see a path out, try to get out, being careful not to move anything that could cause other debris to precipitate or fall on you.

Once you are safe, administer first aid to those who need it and listen to the radio for emergency broadcasts and more information. Be prepared to move to higher elevations if you live on the coast and the earthquake may have triggered a tsunami. If the earthquake was minor, inspect your home and property to make sure you don’t have ruptured gas lines, dangling wires or tree branches, or other hazards that need to be addressed before you can return to your home. If you believe your home has been damaged, call the appropriate service provider to inspect it properly.

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